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NORTH GRAFTON, Mass. (April 6, 2020)—In the latest in a series of efforts by Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University to help keep the people and animals in its local communities healthy and safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, the school’s dean joined forces Thursday with Grafton’s state representative to deliver a supply of personal protective equipment  (PPE) to UMass Memorial Medical Center.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/cummings-school-veterinary-medicine-tufts-university-sends-personal-protective

The pill is the first known working device capable of non-invasively and accurately assessing the profile of bacterial species inhabiting any stage of the gastrointestinal tract

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass. (July 24, 2019) — A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a 3D printed ingestible pill that samples bacteria found in the gut — known as the microbiome — as it passes through the gastrointestinal tract (GI). The ability to profile bacterial species inhabiting the gut could have important implications for the understanding of conditions that affect and are affected by the intestinal microbiome, according to the researchers.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/3d-printed-pill-samples-gut-microbiome-aid-diagnosis-and-treatment

Tufts University and TGen novel findings for this deadly bone cancer could lead to better treatments for people and pets

BOSTON, Mass., and PHOENIX, Ariz., (July 19, 2019)—A bone cancer known as osteosarcoma is genetically similar in dogs and human children, according to the results of a study published today by Tufts University and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope. The findings could help break the logjam in the treatment of this deadly disease, which hasn’t seen a significant medical breakthrough in nearly three decades.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/study-reveals-genetic-similarities-osteosarcoma-between-dogs-and-children

NORTH GRAFTON, Mass. (May 13, 2019)–Equipped to excel at career paths ranging from veterinary medicine to conservation medicine, the study of infectious disease, and advancement of animal policy and animal welfare issues, 147 students will be awarded degrees on Sunday, May 19, at 3 p.m. from New England’s only veterinary school, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. The celebration of Commencement will be marked by speeches, awards and the presentation of degrees.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/cummings-school-veterinary-medicine-tufts-university-hosts-37th-commencement

Center for Integrated Management of Antimicrobial Resistance to leverage strengths of the university and medical center to research mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and develop new strategies for treatment and education

Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center unite decades of experience and expertise in infectious disease research and clinical care with the Tufts Center for Integrated Management of Antimicrobial Resistance to more effectively address the rise and spread of multi-drug resistant organisms.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/tufts-university-tufts-medical-center-launch-center-study-antimicrobial-resistance

Trials for osteosarcoma and solid tumors enrolling at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at Tufts University for eligible canine candidates

GRAFTON, Mass. (Oct. 11, 2018)—Two studies into deadly cancers in dogs are now underway, offered through the newly formed Clinical Trials Office at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at Tufts University. Dogs with spontaneous osteosarcoma, as well as dogs with mast cell tumors and solid tumors, may be eligible for enrollment.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/new-clinical-trials-seek-treatments-canine-cancers-may-offer-clues-human-cancers

NORTH GRAFTON, Mass., May 14, 2018—Forty years ago, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University became New England’s only veterinary school, focused on education, clinical care and interdisciplinary research. This Sunday, May 20, 2018, at 3pm, the school will award degrees to 147 students—whose studies varied from veterinary medicine to the intersection of animals and public policy, to infectious disease and global health—at its 36th Commencement.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/cummings-school-veterinary-medicine-tufts-university-hosts-36th-commencement

NORTH GRAFTON, Mass. (April 12, 2018)—Service animals—from guide dogs to military and search and rescue animals, and many others in important roles—selflessly help their humans each day, depending on their vision to perform vital tasks that their owners or other humans often cannot. In May 2018, Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at Tufts University will join the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO) to support these animals during the 11th annual ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/free-eye-exams-service-and-working-animals-offered-may-cummings-veterinary-medical

GRAFTON, Mass. (February 15, 2018)—The Henry and Lois Foster Hospital for Small Animals at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at Tufts University recently earned referral accreditation from the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) in 15 areas of specialty veterinary medicine. Foster Hospital is one of only a few facilities in the country to receive AAHA referral accreditation for such a large number of specialties. The accreditation followed a rigorous review of the hospital’s practice protocols, medical equipment, facility and client service.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/small-animal-hospital-cummings-veterinary-medical-center-tufts-university-receives

Ziggy Star the fur seal back home at Mystic Aquarium, recovering from surgery at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University

GRAFTON, Mass. (December 27, 2017)— A neurosurgical team at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University has successfully performed what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind brain surgery on a Northern fur seal named Ziggy Star in an attempt to address her worsening neurologic condition. Ziggy, an adult female, is recovering well at her permanent home at Mystic Aquarium in Mystic, Connecticut.

SOURCE: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/veterinary-surgeons-perform-first-known-brain-surgery-treat-hydrocephalus-fur-seal