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Cancer Collaborative

Beautiful Relationship Emerges Out of Darkness

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

Neither broken leg nor ulcers could keep Beau down, and owner Debra Benanti gives credit to the educational commitment of Tufts Hospital for Large Animals at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center for not only Beau’s survival, but their close relationship following his treatments.

A Potential Breakthrough on Liver Cancer

Friday, September 5th, 2014

“We don’t think this is going to cure liver cancer, but it might help prevent it,” says Arlin Rogers. “History shows the best way to reduce the burden of cancer is to stop it from occurring in the first place.” Tufts researcher finds that the hormone prolactin may help prevent the disease.

Willy’s Gift

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Zoey and Mahlon Hale with Willy, for whom they named a research fund at Cummings School.

Healing Puppy Power Put to Test for Childhood Cancer

Friday, May 16th, 2014

Dog Fancy The Cummings School will be one of the test sites for a new study on the effects of therapy animals in pediatric cancer patients. http://www.dogchannel.com/dog-news/2014/05/healing-puppy-power-put-to-test.aspx

Drug Detects Lingering Cancer Cells

Friday, November 8th, 2013

John Berg, a veterinary surgeon at Tufts, is testing the experimental technique on canine patients, hoping to raise survival rates

Cancer Cells

Spotlight on Cancer

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Experimental technique can detect tiny bits of malignancy after surgery. Exposed to the fluorescent drug, the cancerous cells in this tumor “light up” white or light gray, while the normal tissue remains black.

A Better Mousetrap

Monday, March 11th, 2013

Can cats help advance cancer treatment where mice have failed? The traditional means of testing a potential treatment for cancer is to get a lab full of mice and conduct controlled experiments that attempt to prevent tumor growth. In the late 1990s, such studies produced a new medication that choked off the blood flow to malignant cells. It was hailed as a wonder drug. “There was literally a headline in the New York Times saying scientists would cure cancer within two years,” says Elizabeth McNiel, a veterinary oncologist at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. “It was huge.”

Cell Cure

Friday, February 1st, 2013

A novel cell transplant therapy holds promise for treating human and animal cancers. Raimon Duran-Struuck wants to unlock the potential of hematopoietic cell transplants in human and animal medicine.