Open Menu Close Menu Open Search Close Search Open Directory Close Directory

Client Education

Why Are Horses So Fast?

Friday, June 7th, 2019

Breathing only through their noses—and having big hearts—give them a boost
The Tufts video series Ever Wonder features faculty and other experts answering questions for the curious about all manner of topics—from how parrots talk to why cats purr.

Backyard Chickens and the Risk of Lead Exposure

Wednesday, May 29th, 2019

Urban dwellers need to take precautions to prevent their egg layers from bringing the heavy metal into the food chain
When Teresa McGowan and her husband first bought their Somerville, Massachusetts, home in 2004, one of the first things they did was test the soil in their yard for lead. It was a recommendation from local gardeners, who knew that produce grown in contaminated soil can be dangerous.

Research has shown that lead is a potent neurotoxin, associated with reduced IQ, attention-related behavior problems, and poor academic achievement in children exposed to it through food or environmental factors.

Asking the Right Questions to Make Informed Decisions about Pet Foods

Tuesday, May 28th, 2019

We’re big fans of the WSAVA guidelines for selecting pet foods and there is a new online tool from the Pet Nutrition Alliance that allows you to see answers from pet food manufacturers to some of the questions WSAVA recommends asking about your pet’s food

Finding Qualified Professional Animal Trainers

Thursday, May 2nd, 2019

Finding a professional trainer to entrust your dog with can be challenging. While many well-qualified trainers give excellent, scientifically-validated advice, there are currently no required credentialing or licensing programs for professional animal trainers.

dog giving his paw

A Chicken and Egg Problem

Wednesday, May 1st, 2019

Urban dwellers looking to raise backyard chickens must take precautions to prevent lead exposure.

Staying Safe with Your Pet Who has Behavioral Issues

Monday, April 29th, 2019

Dr. Stephanie Borns-Weil, a board-certified veterinary behaviorist at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center says, “the best predictor of an animal’s future behavior is past behavior.”