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Small Animal Newsletters

Clinical Case Challenge: Nutrition

Friday, October 21st, 2016

History/Case Details Cole, a 10-year-old male neutered Dalmatian, was presented to the Cummings Veterinary Medical Center’s Emergency Service with stranguria. He had a large, unexpressable bladder, a III/VI systolic murmur on the left side, ventral… Read More

New Foster Hospital Reception Area Open

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

The Foster Hospital renovation is one big step closer to completion, with a more comfortable and updated reception area officially open for clients and patients, as well as state-of-the-art exam rooms and a reflection garden… Read More

Foster Hospital Exterior

The Hidden Dangers of Xylitol to Your Dog

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

Did you know that many common household items (sugarless gum, candy, even some peanut butter) contain Xylitol, a sugar alcohol which is highly toxic to dogs? Learn more about the dangers of Xylitol and what immediate actions to take should your companion animal ingest the toxin. Swift action matters.

Compassion, Expert Care and Patience Combine for Happy Ending

Monday, April 11th, 2016

After eating dirt, Belle, a five-year-old miniature schnauzer felt sick and weak. She was examined by her family veterinarian and blood tests showed a low red blood cell count. Belle’s veterinarian referred her to Foster Hospital for Small Animals at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center where Dr. Alex Lynch diagnosed Belle with red cell aplasia and developed a treatment plan. Belle’s owner, Karen Glowacki of Upton knew that Tufts was in the surrounding vicinity if specialty care was ever required, however, she hoped she would never need it. After being at Foster Hospital, Karen knew she had come to the right place for specialized treatment.

Penny’s Clinical Case Challenge

Friday, April 8th, 2016

Penny, a 12- month -old female spayed Chihuahua mix presented to Foster Hospital for Small Animals at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center due to the development of cutaneous nodules, on the groins, abdomen, back and neck. She was adopted from a shelter in Puerto Rico three months prior. Ruby was previously treated with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for three weeks (15 mg/kg/q 12h, PO) with no signs of improvement.. Penny was referred to the Dermatology service at Foster Hospital for evaluation, testing and treatment options. Penny underwent biopsies along with both bacterial and fungal culture testing. Learn more Penny’s treatment options and her successful outcome.

Have a “Howling” Night with these Halloween Pet Safety Tips

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

We all know that Halloween is full of spooky and a “yummy” kind of fun. Unfortunately, it is a holiday that is full of dangers for our furry friends. While many things are common sense, let’s remind you of the many hazards that may be lurking in the night.

Halloween

At Your Service: Pain Consultation and Referral Service

Wednesday, August 19th, 2015

Who We Are The Pain Consultation and Referral Service (PCRS) at Foster Hospital for Small Animals was created especially for patients with painful conditions that have proven difficult to manage using standard methods. Pain occurs… Read More

Pain Clinic