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Tufts Now

Stories in Tufts Now

Saving the Sea Turtles

Wednesday, February 24th, 2021

When an extraordinary cold spell in Texas led to the largest sea turtle stranding in history, here’s how veterinarians, conservationists, and others stepped in to help Source: https://now.tufts.edu/articles/saving-sea-turtles-texas

sea turtles being rescued

What Happens If COVID-19 Infects Wild Animals?

Monday, January 25th, 2021

Tufts researchers are testing species from bats to seals to see if it’s being spread—and explain how the virus could establish a wildlife reservoir. Click to Read Full Article:https://now.tufts.edu/articles/what-happens-if-covid-19-infects-wild-animals

mink in the wild staring out between two rocks

Helping a Beloved Dog Breed

Monday, January 25th, 2021

Boxers are prone to heart disease, but veterinary cardiologists are researching clues that may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment. Read full article here: https://now.tufts.edu/articles/mending-hearts-beloved-dog-breed

Digital Pathology Transforms Teaching and Research

Wednesday, January 20th, 2021

Faculty and students are taking advantage of new digital pathology technology for remote learning, research on COVID-19 and tuberculosis, and more. Read More Here: https://now.tufts.edu/articles/using-advances-digital-pathology-transform-teaching-and-research

Digital Pathology at Tufts

Teaching Vital Surgeries, One Pet in Need at a Time

Thursday, December 17th, 2020

Yuki Nakayama, V14, is helping Cummings School increase access to surgical care for pets whose owners otherwise couldn’t afford it—and giving students hands-on training in the process

Helping Hands for the Community

Monday, November 30th, 2020

Faculty and staff help support student financial aid and local nonprofits strained by the pandemic through the Tufts Community Appeal

Improving the Odds of Surviving Lymphoma

Monday, October 26th, 2020

A clinical trial looks at whether combining immunotherapy with low doses of chemotherapy can improve outcomes and quality of life for dogs—and someday people.