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Diagnostic Imaging

Seeing Further

Tuesday, December 1st, 2020

As a veterinary technician working in nuclear medicine and CT, Josh Peters has the unique capability to help reveal health issues in animals of all sizes

Joshua Peters, Diagnostic Imaging Technician, poses for a photo outside the Large Animal Hospital on campus at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University on November 17, 2020.

A Better Way to Screen Cats for Heart Disease

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

Training local veterinarians to use ultrasound to screen cats for heart disease could lead to earlier detection, veterinary cardiologists at Cummings School find

veterinarian examing a cat on an exam table

Better Diagnostic Imaging for Pet Rabbits

Thursday, August 8th, 2019

New study shows that GI ultrasounds may reveal source of life-threatening illness for rabbits Gastrointestinal issues are the most common emergency that brings pet rabbits—the third most popular companion small mammal in the U.S.—to the… Read More

Spotting Cancer

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

Sharper imaging would promote earlier diagnosis of malignancies

Contrast agent liver image

Shayla’s miraculous story gives her a second lease on life

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

They say big things come in small packages. Well, you can say the same for big diseases. Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis or GME is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, which effects many small breed dogs and one which very few people know anything about. When Veronica was asked to tell her story about Shayla, she jumped at the chance as this became a perfect opportunity to raise awareness of this little known and often fatal disease. Pet parents should always be vigilant for any unusual signs of illness in their pets. In cases of GME, Veronica Morrison would encourage you to be aware of signs or symptoms, such as stumbling, circling, torticollis (head turning) or an uneven gait. And Veronica is thrilled to report that with Foster Hospital for Small Animals at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine expert clinical services, Shayla was diagnosed early enough and her story has a happy ending.

Second Opinion at Tufts Saves Shayla’s Life

Friday, October 24th, 2014

They say big things come in small packages. Well, you can say the same for big diseases. Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis or GME is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, which effects many small breed dogs and one which very few people know anything about. When Veronica was asked to tell her story about Shayla, she jumped at the chance as this became a perfect opportunity to raise awareness of this little known and often fatal disease. Pet parents should always be vigilant for any unusual signs of illness in their pets. In cases of GME, Veronica Morrison would encourage you to be aware of signs or symptoms, such as stumbling, circling, torticollis (head turning) or an uneven gait. And Veronica is thrilled to report that with Tufts’ expert clinical services, Shayla was diagnosed early enough and her story has a happy ending.

At Your Service: Interdisciplinary Team

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

An Interdisciplinary Team Approach to Hepatobiliary Disease At the Tufts Foster Hospital for Small Animals at the Cummings School Veterinary Medicine, we rely heavily on a talented team of veterinary specialists to help treat small… Read More

Clinical Case Challenge: Diagnostic Imaging (Dog)

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

History An 8 year-old spayed female Golden Retriever was referred to the Foster Hospital for Small Animals with a three-week history of right forelimb lameness. On physical examination the dog would not bear weight on… Read More