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Articles tagged: oncologist

At Your Service: Radiation Oncology and Soft Tissue Veterinary Professionals Partner Together for Molly’s Case

Friday, April 17th, 2015

The news that a beloved family pet has cancer can be very upsetting. The good news is that many pets diagnosed with cancer have treatment options available to help them with their diagnosis.. At Foster Hospital for Small Animals at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center, our medical and radiation oncologists and soft tissue surgeons work together to develop an individualized treatment plan based unique patient needs. Foster
Hospital’s radiation oncology and soft tissue services are lead by board- certified specialists to assist you. Read more about our radiation oncology and soft tissue services and the best way to refer a client or obtain a consult from our team.

Truffle’s story

Friday, October 24th, 2014

Some people looked at the rescued feral kitten in pitiful shape with a deep gash on her flank, and deemed her a hopeless and unadoptable animal. But Ruth, working then in the local animal control office, instead saw a handsome tuxedo-colored feline with a sweet disposition and a manner that conveyed she needed a family.

Babushe

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

Imagine a very sweet 14-year-old chocolate lab who shuffles around and looks like he’s a hundred… His owner is crazy in love with him, … and he was diagnosed with lymphoma
Lymphoma is one of the most common cancers we see in the Oncology service

Willy’s Gift

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Zoey and Mahlon Hale with Willy, for whom they named a research fund at Cummings School.

Willy’s Story

Friday, March 28th, 2014

In the kitchen, Willy Hale is always at your feet, waiting for food. The black American shorthair feline has polydactyl paws wide enough to pick up almost anything that accidentally hits the floor. But retired… Read More

A Better Mousetrap

Monday, March 11th, 2013

Can cats help advance cancer treatment where mice have failed? The traditional means of testing a potential treatment for cancer is to get a lab full of mice and conduct controlled experiments that attempt to prevent tumor growth. In the late 1990s, such studies produced a new medication that choked off the blood flow to malignant cells. It was hailed as a wonder drug. “There was literally a headline in the New York Times saying scientists would cure cancer within two years,” says Elizabeth McNiel, a veterinary oncologist at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. “It was huge.”

At Your Service: Oncology

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

Tufts’ Clinical Oncology Team The clinical oncology service at Tufts’ Foster Hospital is comprised of veterinary oncologists, residents and technicians who work together as a team.  The oncologists work closely with the surgery service, which has… Read More